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Posts Tagged ‘abortion’

Today Scott Roeder was convicted of first-degree murder of Dr. George Tiller, a late-term abortion provider in Wichita, KS. I am incredibly relieved that the judge did not give the jury the instruction for voluntary manslaughter. (Roeder wanted to argue that his motive for killing Dr. Tiller was to save the life of unborn babies, therefore reducing the charge to voluntary  manslaughter). However, not even a sentence to life in prison can lessen the incredible sadness and tragedy surrounding Dr. Tiller’s death. I fear that there are others in this country like Scott Roeder who feel that they are justified in taking the life of someone working to help women and promote female agency, in order to save the life of a fetus.  I fear that these people will not be deterred by Roeder’s conviction.  I fear that some judge in some state will be willing to give a jury a voluntary manslaughter instruction.

The loss of Dr. Tiller also means the loss of another doctor who is willing to perform late-term abortions (and abortions in general). This means that more women will lack access to safe abortions. More women will be forced into making certain decisions about their bodies, in which they really had no choice. More women will turn to unsafe methods to ending their pregnancies. Dr. Tiller’s death represents another loss of women’s rights in this country. It is another way in which women’s control over their own bodies is being stripped away.

I hope that Scott Roeder is sentenced to life in prison without parole, because it frightens me to think of what he would do if released on parole. It is at times like this that I wish I had gone to medical school and could lend a hand in providing women with safe, comprehensive reproductive health care. As a lawyer I will be able to contribute to legislative changes and protecting women’s legal rights, but it is hard to sit back and not be able to directly provide women with the medical services they desire.  I only hope that there are others like Dr. Tiller who will not be afraid to continue fighting for women’s access to abortion.

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Yesterday was the 37th anniversary of Roe v. Wade.  Despite Obama’s election, in the past year events have occurred that have made me question how long women will continue to enjoy the right to choose.  The murder of Dr. Tiller continues to disturb me – knowing that there are people in this country who have so much disrespect for women and those who seek to protect their bodily integrity and freedom.  Yet I also remember that even with Roe v. Wade (mostly) in tact, there are many women in this country who, because of the color of their skin or the amount of money in their bank accounts, do not currently enjoy the same choices as women who have the “right” skin color or enough money to pay for their choices.  As we continue to fight to protect our right to choose, we must remember that there are many of us who have had choices taken away already.  We must not only fight to prevent losing rights but to restore the rights that no longer exist.

The election of Scott Brown in Massachusetts has also reminded me that we must not be single-minded. Advocating for women does not only mean advocating for abortion rights. It means paying attention to the candidates who will be making policies, not just health policies, but education and financial policies, that affect women.  I truly hope that the left-leaning community can find more coherence and start helping Obama create the change he promised, and I hope that on this day next year I will be more optimistic about Roe v. Wade’s legacy.

Read more about the anniversary of Roe v. Wade on feministing and feministe.

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Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) (a UCLA law grad!) speaks out against the Stupak Amendment, and does a great job explaining why it will limit access and harm healthcare for women and girls.

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imagesThere is nothing that angers me more than men making decisions that greatly affect the choices of women. When it happened with the partial birth abortion ban, we all were quick to attribute the awful decision to Bush being in the White House, but now Obama is here, and nothing has really changed.

The Stupak Amendment, which was added to the healthcare bill, which just passed in the House, prohibits anyone receiving federal health care coverage from buying plans that cover abortion. This means that it will be even harder for women to access abortion.

I am not going to spend this post talking about all the reasons why a woman might need an abortion that go beyond the “irresponsible, unprotected sex” narrative. And, never having had an abortion, I certainly don’t feel that ist is my place to explain how abortion is not a decision that most women take lightly – there are many people who have explained it more eloquently and truthfully than I can. Instead, I would like to take a minute to point out that political moves like the Stupak Amendment demonstrate exactly why women are still considered second class citizens, women’s bodies still are considered to be of much less value than men’s, and that we have a far way to go before women truly have equality in this country. Men should not be making these decisions, and men should certainly not be writing these amendments and arguing that women should not be having an abortion. Until men can get pregnant, they will have no idea what it feels like to have bodily autonomy slowly stripped away.

I know that this healthcare bill, if it is enacted, will be an incredible step forward, but I am sick of women being the casualties of “progress.” I sincerely hope that while the bill is debated in the Senate women (and our pro-choice male allies) continue to push for this amendment to be removed, to not continue to make sacrifices that compromise the autonomy of women in this country. And, I hope that Obama takes a stand against this amendment. I have yet to be convinced that he truly meant what he said during his campaign. I have yet to believe that he will dedicate any greater attention to women in this country than presidents in the past.  I still have hope, but if this bill passes in the Senate with the Stupak amendment in tact, I will certainly not be celebrating, because it will just mean that I do not merit the same respect as my fellow male citizens.

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Salon.com reports on a new law in Oklahoma that is set to take effect on Nov. 1 which would post detailed information about every abortion performed in the state on the internet. The rationale behind this law: decrease the number of abortions.

This is such a gross violation of privacy, and it just shows how little a woman’s right to have control over her body and the decisions she makes about her body are valued in some places.

What seems so crazy to me is all the talk about decreasing the number of abortions as if many women out there are just dying to have an abortion. I don’t know about you, but I certainly don’t consider an abortion to be a form of birth control, but rather a last resort.  I think that this is the way many women feel, since having an abortion is by no means an easy choice or a pleasant process. Scaring women out of having abortions is not the way to decrease the number of abortions that are performed in this country. Instead, we need to be educating women about safe-sex practices and providing resources to women so that they feel like they can bring a child into the world and adequately care for it.

Luckily the Center for Reproductive Rights has brought a lawsuit against Oklahoma, which I sincerely hope is successful. But for now, I must say, Shame on you Oklahoma, shame on you.

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