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Posts Tagged ‘men’

I’ve been on quite a hiatus from posting recently due to various factors, including a two-week long vacation and moving into a new apartment. Today, I read some news that made it so easy to get back into blogging.

The first “sex robot” has been released. Her name is ROXXXY (so original!), and in addition to having the features of other “real dolls” she can “speak and listen, and actually learns what her owner likes and dislikes.” She can also talk about sports! It’s a guy’s dream, right? A woman who is there for sex and to talk sports, but who isn’t actually a real woman.  This continues to make me sick, and I’d really like to meet one of the men who are actually purchasing these robots (which cost a mere $7000), and find out what on earth they are thinking.

As if women aren’t already taught to believe that they should look like dolls (see, e.g., the Barbie franchise), now there are actually robot dolls that men can choose instead of real women. Honestly, it makes me sick. Also, does anyone else think there’s a weird Stepford element going on here?

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I love Kate Harding, who writes for salon.com. She’s brilliant, and she always manages to say exactly what I want to say, but can’t find the words to express it eloquently. In this post she talks about the Method commercial that has been getting a lot of attention because it makes light of sexual harassment. The company decided to pull it when they realized that their target demographic (women) was actually offended by the product rather than intrigued. She discusses the blogger Steve Hall who wrote a post about how annoying feminist bloggers are and how they should be banned from the blogosphere.

Of course I’m personally offended by this, since I consider myself to be a feminist blogger, but I also think that when you put Steve Hall and Tucker Max together what you get is a new culture of men who are incredibly afraid of feminists and strong women in general. These men seem to think that it’s funny to objectify women and to make fun of sexual violence. They think that feminists should keep their mouths shut and lighten up. Although it’s possible that these men are few and far between, I worry that they are in fact more common than we think. It certainly doesn’t help that “I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell” exists for mass consumption. I’m not sure that I have a point here, but I just wish that there was more education out there for young men to feel comfortable with themselves and respect women. Because ultimately I think this all boils down to men being incredibly self-conscious and uncomfortable with themselves.

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I have been so bad about blogging lately, which is in part due to the fact that I have a big paper due soon, and I’ve been desperately trying not to procrastinate. The procrastination has won over, however, especially after I saw this article.  Written by Manohla Dargis, one of the NY Times film critics (and, I admit, my least favorite NY Times critic), this article discusses the lack of opportunities for female directors in Hollywood.  She cites to some pretty depressing statistics, not the least of which is that in the 81 years of the Academy Awards, only 3 women have been nominated for best director. (!!) None of them won. Organizations like The Women’s Media Center and the blog Women and Hollywood are vigilant about tracking these statistics.

It’s hard to know why women have fared so badly in Hollywood in the last few decades, though any business that refers to its creations as product cannot, by definition, have much imagination. The vogue for comics and superheroes has generally forced women to sigh and squeal on the sidelines. Even the so-called independent sector, with its ostensibly different players and values, hasn’t been much better, as we know from all the female directors who have made a splash at the Sundance Film Festival only to disappear. New digital technologies and the Internet have leveled the field — though usually it seems as if it’s sheer grit that pushes filmmakers like Kelly Reichardt (“Wendy and Lucy”) along the hard road from idea to distribution.

I recently wrote a law review article that discusses the idea of digital technology and its democratizing potential. (Soon to be published…) I think there’s a lot to be said for the fact that more women are starting to use new (cheaper) digital technologies to create their own films without the backing of a studio. These films always tend to be more interesting anyway. But, I think it’s insane that the studios haven’t caught on to the fact that women go see movies. And, many women are interested in more than cheesy romantic comedies. I enjoy rom-coms as much as the next girl, but I personally feel so refreshed when I go see a movie like Whip It! or Bright Star. Not to mention that it would be nice for younger girls to see role models on the screen, rather than just Bella and her dysfunctional relationship with Edward. (Sorry, at this point I feel like a Twilight reference is obligatory).  I could go on and on about the blatant discrimination that happens in Hollywood, but I’ll spare you.

What I would like to say, however, is that this year there has been a whole slew of films that are directed by women and are starring women. And, many of these movies are not your typical rom-coms (see Bright Star, Coco Avant Chanel, An Education, The Hurt Locker, Julie & Julia). Many of these movies and directors are getting Oscar buzz, but predictably, male-driven films like Up in the Air and Avatar threaten to pull ahead and woo the Academy with quirky style or crazy special effects (respectively).  Bright Star, Coco Avant Chanel, and Julie & Julia, I think, are the best three movies that I have seen all year. I am not advocating for the Academy to give the best director award to a woman, just because she’s a woman, but I think they should at least take it into account. And, this year seems to be the perfect year to do it. I also hope that the studios will get their heads out of the ground (to be kind) and look at how many both financially and critically successful films came out this year that were led by women. Next year, I hope to see even more…

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high-heels-250x250There’s a great article in The Guardian today about flats versus heels. The author explains that wearing flats regularly instead of the heels that fashion magazines dictate is an “act of collective fashion disobedience.” She explains:

Fashion has given us shoes as decorative objects, not footwear. A couple of years ago, Prada brought out shoes whose heels were shaped as vases. They sent out a specific message about the person wearing them: that they had elevated themselves above such plebeian activities as walking. Like the towering wigs of women in the 18th century, or the hoops and bustles of the 19th, they signal a life lived entirely ornamentally.

While I appreciate the beauty of high heels, and do (on very rare occasions) put them on to feel particularly fashionable, I spend most of my life in flats – not comfort flats (and never sneakers), mind you, but flats nonetheless. My dad likes to say that women wear high heels in order to show off their chests and their butts. I’m not sure if this is really the case, but I do think that there’s this expectation that to be sexy women should be wearing high heels. A guy recently told me that he thinks women should wear high heels all the time, because it just looks better.

It does seem like many women wear heels in order to live up to some kind of beauty expectation that was largely put into place by men. In this way, I can see how not wearing heels is an act of feminist defiance. Heels are, after all,  incredibly uncomfortable (I dare you to find me a pair of 3 or 4 inch heels that you can wear comfortably all day), and they can cause long lasting back and leg pain. I will continue to wear my flats with pride, and I won’t have to worry about bringing a change of shoes with me everywhere I go.

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Barbie is a copyright of Mattel.

No joke. Mattel and Universal have reached an agreement to create a live-action Barbie, feature length film. No casting or plot details have been released.

Why can’t Barbie just disappear? As the writers at The Frisky point out, how can you create a live-action character of a doll who would not be able to stand upright because of her proportions? And what on earth is the plot going to consist of? Did she ever actually have a story beyond being a blonde, beach loving bimbo? I’m sorry, but my idea of creating a larger market of movies for women and girls does not involved contrived movies based on a totally regressive, sexist doll. Oh, and not surprisingly, everyone involved so far is a man.

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